before/after Dirty Girl mud run

Before/After Dirty Girl Mud Run T-Shirt Photo

First time here? Use the CustomInk design lab to make your own t-shirts!

  • Is it a winner?

  • Current Score2.0
Design Your Own
  • Wow%20-%20sisters%202012%20back
    < previous
  • Band%20pic%202012
    next >
"Dirty Girl mud runs are fund raisers for breast cancer research. It's a women only event ( of course men are allowed to come and support their women). 5k obstacle course of mud pits, wall climbs, rope net climbs, and more mud pits. Loads of crazy outfits, laughs and of course FUN. All to raise money for a great cause. This run was at Sundance Ranch in Manvel, TX. But Dirty Girl sponsors these events all across the country. Custom link was awesome to work with and sizes/designs came out exactly as they appeared on-line. We were extremely pleased with our shirts and their quality. Everyone at Customink was very helpful and I received my order ahead of schedule. I would definitely order from Customink again." - Dirty Couches (Oct 24, 2012)

Similar Photos: BEFORE/AFTER Dirty Girl mud run | breast cancer research | charity | dirty girl mud run | event sporting | fun | mud | mud run | muddy | participant teams | pink | texas | TX | sundance ranch | manvel | small group

Share this photo: Twitter Twitter Facebook Facebook

comment by Guest - Feb 23, 2013 - back to the top

Both books discuss the aetpcss of recycling wastewater treatment plant effluent into potable water for agriculture, industry, or household use. What are the examples they discussed, and why did both authors emphasize this idea? In The Big Thirst, it talks about how approximately 95% of the potable water distributed by water facilities is used for things like watering the lawn, flushing the toilet, or take baths. This means about 5% is used for things that actually require nice, purified, drinking-ready water like cooking and drinking. If we were to replace that 95% of water, or even 50%, with water that didn't have to be purified we could save water for drinking. This could be easily accomplished by recycling the water that has already been used for drinking, namely wastewater runoff. Both authors emphasize this idea because it is a proven solution that assists in communities where there is little to no extra water available. The purple-pipe water (non-potable treated water is transported in purple pipes where it is available) is generally cheaper because of the law of supply and demand (most businesses/homes want potable water more than they do recycled wastewater), which assists in the economic growth because companies can buy cheaper water and pass those savings on through their products.In Orange County, Florida, every new subdivision for the past 25 years has been required to put in a purple-pipe water system, and they use almost as much purple-pipe water as they do potable drinking water. It also recycles all the drinking water back into the system, so it saves money (the county doesn't have to procure new water all the time) and more importantly, water resources.

comment by Guest - Feb 23, 2013 - back to the top

Both books discuss the aetpcss of recycling wastewater treatment plant effluent into potable water for agriculture, industry, or household use. What are the examples they discussed, and why did both authors emphasize this idea? In The Big Thirst, it talks about how approximately 95% of the potable water distributed by water facilities is used for things like watering the lawn, flushing the toilet, or take baths. This means about 5% is used for things that actually require nice, purified, drinking-ready water like cooking and drinking. If we were to replace that 95% of water, or even 50%, with water that didn't have to be purified we could save water for drinking. This could be easily accomplished by recycling the water that has already been used for drinking, namely wastewater runoff. Both authors emphasize this idea because it is a proven solution that assists in communities where there is little to no extra water available. The purple-pipe water (non-potable treated water is transported in purple pipes where it is available) is generally cheaper because of the law of supply and demand (most businesses/homes want potable water more than they do recycled wastewater), which assists in the economic growth because companies can buy cheaper water and pass those savings on through their products.In Orange County, Florida, every new subdivision for the past 25 years has been required to put in a purple-pipe water system, and they use almost as much purple-pipe water as they do potable drinking water. It also recycles all the drinking water back into the system, so it saves money (the county doesn't have to procure new water all the time) and more importantly, water resources.